Welcome to the Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law. This section is updated on a regular basis (date stamp below) and provides current and prospective students responses to frequently asked questions (FAQ), separated by topic: 

•    About the program
•    Admission requirements
•    Three-term transition 
•    Program length and term information 
•    Expected course load
•    Financial requirements
•    Entry-to-Practice (EPE) Exam eligibility

NOTE: The following FAQ is intended to provide current and prospective students with a high-level understanding of the Graduate Diploma, including academic requirements, program timelines, eligibility and expectations. However, this FAQ is not a substitute for reading and understanding the Handbook of Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures, which can be found HERE.

We encourage your input on ways we can continue to make this resource more helpful. Please send your feedback to immigrationdiploma@queensu.ca under the subject line “FAQ improvements.”

Updated: February 24, 2021

About the program

 

What is the Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law? 

Queen’s Law is empowering tomorrow’s immigration leaders, today. The Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law is an innovative and comprehensive program designed to equip students with the knowledge, practical skills and critical judgement necessary for immigration consulting as well as roles in the broader immigration ecosystem. The Graduate Diploma will prepare you for the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council’s (ICCRC) mandatory Entry-to-Practice Exam, build strategic competencies, and position you for success in this complex and rewarding field.

 

Who is this program for?  

The Graduate Diploma is designed for individuals who are looking to enter Canada’s immigration sector, as well as those seeking to enhance their skills and understanding of the immigration system to support and advance in their existing professions. The program's courses are aligned with the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council’s (ICCRC) essential competencies for Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants, and provide students with a deep understanding of Canadian immigration and citizenship law and procedures. They merge theory and practice to prepare students for a number of vital roles in the immigration sector, as well as functions that support organizations on immigration and citizenship matters. These include: 

•    Prospective immigration consultants
•    Paralegals
•    Lawyers seeking specialized training in immigration law
•    Advisors and recruitment specialists at universities and colleges
•    Human resources professionals
•    Leaders in immigration settlement organizations 
•    Constituency assistants for members of federal, provincial, and territorial legislatures
•    Immigration and border policy analysts and program specialists in government agencies 
•    Business development leads at law firms
•    Diplomatic services and consular support professionals

To learn more about the ICCRC’s essential competencies for Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants, click HERE.

 

If I do not plan to become an immigration consultant, is this program still for me? 

Immigration practice is only one professional pathway you can explore. Immigration is essential to Canada’s future prosperity, and is a fundamental building block of our economy. By completing this program, you will be able to leverage your foundational and practical understanding of Canada’s immigration sector, to any number of career paths. 

From non-profit organizations, government agencies, to professional management firms, corporations and more, businesses and organizations require skilled immigration practitioners to help them navigate the future of Canada’s workforce and the broader economy. The Graduate Diploma is purpose-built to support a broad range of professions, including immigration practitioners, lawyers, paralegals, legal assistants, staff of non-profit organizations, educators working with international students, and human resources professionals.
 

 

What does the program consist of? 

The Graduate Diploma is a three-term, nine-course program that is optimized for an online learning environment. Students can complete the program in under 12 months to progress towards the Entry-to-Practice Exam, and an exciting career path in the immigration sector. The program’s courses are aligned with the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council’s (ICCRC) essential competencies for Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants, and ensure students are equipped with a deep understanding of Canadian immigration and citizenship law and procedures, as well as the knowledge and skills necessary for successful practice.

The Graduate Diploma courses include: 

•    Foundations of Canadian Immigration Law
•    Ethics and Professional Responsibility
•    Temporary Entry
•    Economic Immigration
•    Family Class Immigration
•    Refugee Protection & Trauma-Informed Client Service
•    Enforcement – Inadmissibility, Detention and Removal
•    Citizenship
•    Immigration Practice Management

Learn more about the Graduate Diploma courses HERE. To learn more about the ICCRC’s essential competencies for Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultants, click HERE.

 

How was the program developed?

The content for the Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law was developed by internationally-recognized immigration law experts and seasoned practitioners. The result is a program that integrates substantive academic knowledge with practical skills required for success in 21st century practice. 

The development of the Graduate Diploma program has been guided by a National Advisory Committee, comprised of licensed immigration consultants, lawyers and community experts who have worked in all areas of Canada’s immigration ecosystem. From Canada’s top consulting practices, refugee legal aid clinics, and the Immigration and Refugee Board to immigration law firms, settlement organizations and industry associations, our advisory council members bring the full wealth of their experience to the stewardship of the Graduate Diploma program. 

Learn more about our course developers HERE
Learn more about our National Advisory Committee HERE

 

From start to finish, how long is the program?

The Graduate Diploma is a three-term, nine-course program delivered in under 12 months. The graphic below shows a high-level course breakdown for the September 2021 intake period.

Three Term Model

Please see the “program length and term information” section below for more information. 

 

Are part-time options available? 

While the program is designed for full-time learning to prepare students for the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council’s mandatory Entry-to-Practice Exam, part-time options are available on a limited basis. Starting in the 2021-2022 academic year, all students will have the ability to take courses throughout the majority of the year. 

For some, this may give you additional flexibility to complete the program earlier than anticipated. While others, who are managing their course load in conjunction with other personal or professional responsibilities, have between 24 to 36 months to complete the program requirements. Our aim is to maximize opportunities for students to participate in this program so they can begin the process towards their licensing requirements with the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council, and a rewarding career. 

 

Is the program delivered in-person, online, or both? 

The program is designed and optimized for an online learning environment, with live tutorials that feature direct interaction with instructors who are leading experts in the field, as well as digital collaboration platforms to encourage peer-to-peer learning through simulations and discussion forums. Students will acquire foundational knowledge, build their professional skills, and navigate this rapidly evolving sector in a dynamic, experiential learning setting.

Self-directed learning is an important component of this program to prepare students for the rigors of the profession. One of the key differences between undergraduate and graduate-level education is that graduate students are responsible for a much larger part of the learning process. Students are responsible for managing their learning strategies through self-directed work, including time and workload management, asking probing questions during tutorials, staying abreast of sector developments and charting their own intellectual exploration. 

 

What online platform do you use for course instruction?

onQ is Queen's University's enterprise learning management system, built in the Brightspace/Desire2learn environment that many students are already familiar with, both at Queen's and at other institutions.
 

 

How was Queen’s University selected to administer this program? 

Queen's is a dynamic, academically acclaimed research and teaching institution with leading researchers in immigration law and migration theory. Moreover, the Faculty of Law at Queen's University is a national and international leader in online and experiential education. 

In 2018, the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council (ICCRC) issued a Request for Proposals to retain an educational provider to design, develop and implement a graduate program that would be accredited by the ICCRC. After a proponent review process, Queen’s University was selected as the sole accredited English provider of the graduate diploma in May 2019. 

Learn more about Queen’s Law HERE.

 

What kind of designation will I receive upon completion?

Upon successful completion, students will receive a Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law from Queen’s University, this is referred to as a “GDipICL”. To become an accredited Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant, applicants are required to write the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council’s (ICCRC) Entry-to-Practice Exam and meet all of the mandatory requirements outlined in the ICCRC’s registration guide

The Graduate Diploma does not constitute a Juris Doctor (JD) Degree or qualify graduates to practice law.

Admission requirements

 

What are the mandatory admission requirements for the program?

Prospective students require the following:  

1.    A Bachelor's degree from a recognized university (or equivalent institution*)
2.    Transcripts that confirm a B minimum average
3.    English language proficiency test scores (see section below)
4.    Contact information for two references who will submit letters of reference 
(note: at least one academic reference is required for students who have graduated from a bachelor’s degree less than five years prior to application)
5.    A 250 word (1450 character) Statement of Interest explaining your career objectives and reasons for wanting to pursue the Graduate Diploma. This is an important document that will be considered as part of the application review process

*Applicants with a degree from a post-secondary institution that is not a recognized university will be considered on a case-by-case basis. 

Please note: the information above is a summary for information purposes. Please review our admissions page HERE for a detailed list of requirements to ensure you are meeting the application requirements, as well as the Handbook of Academic Regulations, Policies and Procedures, which can be found HERE.

 

How do I submit transcripts? 

A complete application must include official, up-to-date transcripts for all current and previous study you have listed in the Academic Background section of your application. Transcripts must be scanned (black and white recommended) and saved as a PDF file, then uploaded to the online application. Please see the “Tips for Transcript Upload” document HERE. You can also consult the School of Graduate Studies website for more information, HERE.

 

My university is only sending e-transcripts during this time. Is that acceptable?

In these unusual circumstances, the School of Graduate Studies (SGS) will accept e-transcripts if they are generated and sent directly by the issuing university to grad.studies@queensu.ca, or by fax to 1-613-533-6015.  Courier cannot be processed for now, but Canada Post Services is still operational so SGS can pick up and process transcripts by regular mail. 


Parties should understand that official hard copy transcripts will still be required, eventually.   For more information, please see, Section 5, Newly Admitted and Applying Students: https://www.queensu.ca/sgs/node/1739

 

What does a professional reference mean?

A professional letter of recommendation should be a letter from an employer or workplace supervisor. The reference cannot be from a colleague, but should be someone whom you report to.

 

Does providing all the required documentation ensure that I will be enrolled? 

Providing all the required documentation does not automatically enter you into the program.  Applications are subject to review by the program’s Admissions Committee, which is chaired by the Academic Director and is accountable to the Queen’s School of Graduate Studies as well as the Dean of the Faculty of Law. This committee is responsible for approving decisions throughout the admissions process, and for ongoing evaluation of admissions policies and procedures. The School of Graduate Studies holds final authority for all decisions concerning offers of admission, or notices of refusal of admission, to the Graduate Diploma program based on the committee’s recommendations. Intake periods are currently in January and September. 

 

How do I apply? 

Applications are managed electronically via Queen’s School of Graduate Studies secure application portal. New users will be required to create an account and password to initiate the process. Individuals who require assistance with their online application are encouraged to contact the School of Graduate Studies at sgsapp@queensu.ca.

 

Below is an overview of the application submission and review process: 
Application Process

Please click HERE for PDF version.

 

Is there an admissions pathway for applicants who do not have a B average or a bachelor’s degree from a recognized university? 

Queen’s University School of Graduate Studies is committed to enhancing diversity in graduate education, which includes ensuring mechanisms for applications from prospective students who may not have had opportunity and advantage equal to others to be considered. 

In recognition that life circumstances may prohibit, present barriers, and/or discourage access to pursue advanced degrees, due consideration is given by the Admissions Committee to non-academic factors identified by applicants, and to applicants’ special circumstances and unique qualities. Traditional measures of an applicant’s academic performance will be considered accordingly.

On an individual basis, consideration may be given to highly motivated individuals with some post-secondary degree studies at the university level, as well as professional experience, who do not have a minimum of a B average or a bachelor’s degree from a recognized university. 

Applicants wishing to apply as an “access” candidate should apply through the regular admissions portal and are requested to identify the life circumstances that may have prohibited, presented barriers, and/or discouraged access to advanced degree studies, in their Statement of Interest (see admissions page). Applicants must also send a detailed resume demonstrating a minimum of five (5) years relevant work experience to immigrationdiploma@queensu.ca by the application deadline.

The Admissions Committee retains the discretion to require a personal interview.

 

Can I take program courses without pursuing the full Graduate Diploma? 

Yes. Students who do not wish to apply for the Graduate Diploma but meet the requirements for admission can apply for single course enrolment as either an Interest Student for Program Credit or as an Interest Student for No Program Credit. Students can register for up to four courses individually.
 

Interest student category

Participation in Program

Outcome

Program Credit

•    Students can register for up to four (4) courses individually
•    Note: Program Credit students are required to take ICL 810, Foundations of Canadian Immigration Law prior to taking other courses

•    Assigned a grade upon completion of the course to use toward transcripts and GPA
•    Provided student has good academic standing (B- in all courses) may be eligible for Graduate Diploma
 
No Program Credit •    Students are expected to participate in all aspects of the course but are not required to complete course assessments (quizzes or final assignments) •    Not assigned a grade upon completion of the course
•    Courses cannot be used to satisfy program requirements towards Graduate Diploma
•    May be eligible for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) credit (substantive hours) with the Law Society of Ontario, and CPD/Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) credits in other Canadian jurisdictions. Learn more HERE
 

 

Do I have to be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to enrol in the Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law?

The program is open to applicants of all nationalities regardless of Canadian residency or citizenship status. However, you must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to write the Entry-to-Practice Exam to become a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant.

 

What are the program’s language requirements?

The Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law will prepare you for the mandatory Entry-to-Practice Exam and equip you with the skills you will need to be a successful immigration consultant. As an accredited provider of the Graduate Diploma, we have established minimum language test score requirements to support our students’ pathway to the Entry-to-Practice Exam.

Minimum requirements for the three English language proficiency tests which are accepted for applications to this program are as follows:


•    IELTS (Academic) minimum overall score 7.0 with at least 7.0 for each component
•    TOEFL-PBT Paper-based test minimum overall score of 607
•    TOEFLiBT Internet-based test minimum overall score of 101 with a minimum score in each component of the test as follows:


o    Writing test: 25/30
o    Speaking test: 25/30 
o    Reading test: 25/30  
o    Listening test: 26/30

Read more about the language test scores HERE.

When students register for the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council Entry-to-Practice Exam to become a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant, they are required to achieve at least the minimum required score on an ICCRC-approved English Language Ability Test. Please note: the minimum threshold for the ICCRC is slightly higher than what is required for the Graduate Diploma. 

 

What is the IELTS?

IELTS is an acronym for International English Language Testing System. The IELTS test uses British English and consists of four parts: reading, listening, writing and speaking. It takes two hours and 45 minutes to complete, including transfer time from one section to the next. The IELTS is accepted in thousands of institutions in over 140 countries. However, each institution has its own requirements for IELTS scores. Once students take the test, they can select up to five organizations where copies of their IELTS results will be sent free of charge. 

 

What is the TOEFL?

TOEFL is an acronym for Test of English as a Foreign Language. It is an English proficiency test, developed by an American company, ETS, to measure an individual’s reading, speaking, writing, and listening proficiency in American English. TOEFL scores are a requirement for over 900 universities and other institutions in more than 130 countries. There are two methods of taking this test: as a Paper-Based Test (TOEFL PBT) or an Internet-Based Test (TOEFL IBT). The TOEFL IBT is more popular. You can register and take the TOEFL IBT at designated centers in almost all countries and it takes four hours to complete. 

 

What if my language test scores fall below the requirements for admission – is there a pathway toward admission? 

Yes. Students are required to demonstrate fluency in reading, writing, listening and speaking. To support students in meeting these requirements, English language upgrading and support opportunities are offered by Queen’s School of English, in particular the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) program. This 12-week intensive English language program develops knowledge, skills, and strategies for academic success. It is offered three times per year in fall, winter, and summer.

 

If I meet the language requirements for the Graduate Diploma, will I be eligible to take the ICCRC’s Entry-to-Practice Exam?

English-language requirements for the Entry-to-Practice Exam are slightly higher than those required for the Graduate Diploma. It is the responsibility of each student to ensure they meet the required language requirements to register for the Entry-to-Practice Exam. For detailed information on exam requirements, please review the Entry-to-Practice Exam Application Form

 

Why did Queen’s decide to increase the language requirements for the Graduate Diploma?  

Since the initial design of the program and the development of core admission requirements, the language test scores required by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council to register for the Entry-to-Practice Exam have increased.  

We have adjusted our admission requirements to ensure that graduates of the Graduate Diploma have a successful pathway to registering for the Entry-to-Practice Exam. To support students in meeting their requirements, English language upgrading opportunities are offered by Queen’s School of English, in particular the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) program.

 

Are there exemptions for English language testing

Below are the only exemptions to English language testing. You may be exempted from English language testing, if:  

1.    English is your native language; or

2.    Within the 12-month period prior to the month of application, you have studied for at least two academic terms at a post-secondary institution where English is the official language of instruction. Proof will be required that it has not been more than one year since you were a student at the post-secondary institution and also that English is the language of instruction there. Acceptable proof of this is the original, official transcript, received from the issuing post-secondary institution or uploaded as part of the application for admission.

3.    You have successfully completed the Queen’s School of English, English for Academic Purposes program, with an “A” grade.
 

Three-term transition

 

What is the new program structure of the Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law?

Effective September 2021, students will have three terms to complete the program’s nine required courses in under 12 months. Please refer to the illustration below of our September 2021 intake period.

Three Term Model

Why did Queen’s Law decide to extend the Graduate Program into three terms?

Effective September 2021, the Graduate Diploma will be transitioning from a two-term model to a three-term model for incoming students. This decision was made to improve the educational experience for our students and position them for success. While the Graduate Diploma is designed to be a dynamic and immersive learning experience, after careful review, we determined that an adjustment to the course delivery model was needed to distribute the nine required courses more evenly throughout the academic cycle, offer students a more manageable distribution of coursework and additional time to absorb and integrate the competencies learned.  

Graduate Diploma students can still complete the program in under 12 months and progress towards the Entry-to-Practice Exam and an exciting career path in Canada’s immigration sector. As the program evolves, we will be making refinements and updates to ensure that we are delivering an inclusive, engaging and high-quality program. 

 

Will this impact tuition fees?

No, program tuition will remain the same for both full-time and part-time students. For more information on tuition fees, please visit our Tuition and Financing page.

 

Is there an option to select the two-term model of the program?

We will no longer be offering an option to take a two-term configuration of the program. The Graduate Diploma involves a heavy course load, and the transition to a three-term model was designed to drive successful learning outcomes for our students, both now and in the future. 

 

What if I am currently taking the two-term version of the program?

Full-time students in the January 2021 cohort will have the option of distributing two of their courses from Term 2 to a third term, which will be offered in the Winter Term 2022. Under this model, you will be able to take ICL 850: Family Class Immigration and ICL 860: Refugee Protection and Trauma-Informed Client Service between January and April, which will redistribute some of the course load requirements from your existing Term 2 schedule. 

Current students must reach out to immigrationdiploma@queensu.ca by May 31, 2021 to indicate their decision to extend courses into a third term.

 

Is the transition to three terms mandatory? 

The three-term program model is mandatory for all students starting in September 2021 and beyond.  
However, full-time January 2021 intake students (i.e. those who are currently in-program) can proceed with the current course model that ends in December 2021.

 

Does the transition to three terms impact part-time students who are currently enrolled in the program?

Starting in the 2021-2022 academic year, all students will have the ability to take courses throughout the majority of the year. For some, this may give you additional flexibility to complete the program earlier than anticipated. While others, who are managing their course load in conjunction with other personal or professional responsibilities, may have between 24 to 36 months to complete the program requirements. Our aim is to maximize opportunities for students to participate in this program so they can begin the process towards their Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council requirements, and a rewarding career.
 

Program length and term information

 

How long is the program? 

The Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law is designed as nine courses delivered in three terms in under 12 months, as illustrated below. 

Three Term Model

Are part-time options available? 

While the program is designed for full-time learning, to prepare students for the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council’s mandatory Entry-to-Practice Exam, part-time options are available on a limited basis. 

Starting in the 2021-2022 academic year, all students will have the ability to take courses throughout the majority of the year. For some, this may give you additional flexibility to complete the program earlier than anticipated. While others, who are managing their course load in conjunction with other personal or professional responsibilities, may have 24 to 36 months to complete the program requirements. 

Our aim is to maximize opportunities for students to participate in this program so they can begin the process towards meeting their Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council requirements, and a rewarding career.

To learn more about part-time options, please email immigrationdiploma@queensu.ca.

 

Can I switch between part-time and full-time study? 

Academic change decisions are subject to review and approval and require a plan of study. To submit an academic change form, please click HERE.  

 

When are courses offered?

Beginning in September 2021, courses will be offered in the Fall Term (September - December), Winter Term (January - April) and Summer Term (May – August).   

 

When are the intake periods? 

There are two intakes each academic year, one in September and a second in January. The next intake for the Graduate Diploma is September 2021, followed by January 2022. For the September 2021 intake, the application portal opens on February 16, 2021, and the deadline to receive all official documents and applications is May 31, 2021. Dates for the Winter 2022 intake will be posted by July 1, 2021.  
 

Expected course load

 

What should I expect in terms of course load and hours of work per week?

The Graduate Diploma is designed to be a dynamic and immersive learning experience. The program provides students with the foundational competencies they require to understand the legal frameworks, policies, procedures and regulatory landscape of the immigration sector, while simulating the rigors of the profession they will be entering.  

To that end, students should expect this program to resemble a full-time job in terms of their weekly time commitment. Between reading materials, tutorials, group-work and assignments, students should expect to allocate a significant amount of time to this program. 

Fortunately, this is a direct-to-market program. Equipped with a strong theoretical understanding and practical sector-based knowledge, students are positioned to enter the workforce once they have completed the Entry-to-Practice Exam. 

 

What does that translate to in hours? 

The Graduate Diploma is designed to be a dynamic and immersive learning experience. It would not be uncommon for students to commit upwards of 48 hours a week to the program, and in some case more during busier periods. 

The program is designed and optimized for an online learning environment, with live tutorials that feature direct interaction with instructors who are leading experts in the field, as well as digital collaboration platforms to encourage peer-to-peer learning through simulations and discussion forums. Students will acquire foundational knowledge, build their professional skills, and navigate this rapidly evolving sector in a dynamic, experiential learning setting. 

Self-directed learning is an important component of this program to prepare students for the rigors of the profession. One of the key differences between undergraduate and graduate-level education is that graduate students are responsible for a much larger part of the learning process. Students are responsible for managing their learning strategies through self-directed work, including time and workload management, asking probing questions during tutorials, staying abreast of sector developments and charting their own intellectual exploration. 

 

What is the typical time commitment for tutorials? 

As a graduate level program, there is an expectation for students to be regularly involved in the learning process throughout the week. All courses in the Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law include a schedule of synchronous, mandatory tutorial sessions. While timing varies across each term, students should expect about one to three hours per course, per week. The tutorials are typically offered weekday evenings, Tuesday to Thursday between 4:00 – 10:00 pm ET and Sundays between 9:00 am - 12 pm ET. 

 

Can I select my preferred tutorial time?

Students select their tutorial after they have formally registered. Timeslot preference is based on availability in each tutorial section, and the individual tutorial group size limits, on a first-come basis. Final tutorial placement is communicated 30 days prior to the start of the course.

 

As a Graduate Diploma Student what services can I access?  

Queen’s University has a robust set of services and programs available to support your personal, academic, and social health. Student Wellness Services (SWS) offers a welcoming, confidential, and integrated service that is responsive to your health and wellness needs.

In addition, Queen’s Student Academic Success Services (SASS) offers academic support to students who wish to develop their skills in critical thinking, reading, learning, studying, writing, and self-management. 

Please visit the School of Graduate Studies website for more information on the full range of academic, professional and personal resources available.

Financial requirements

 

What is the total tuition for the Full-Time program? 

Tuition for the program is assessed on a per-term, per-course basis. However, total tuition is about 
$14,200. For more information, please visit our Tuition and Financing page to review all course fees, and tuition payment options. 

(The above information was last updated on February 12, 2021 and is subject to change.)

 

Are there any additional fees for program materials such as course guides/ texts? 

This online program is supported by digital course materials, or “e-books” that are also available in hard cover formats. Students in the Graduate Diploma program have several options for purchasing the required course materials for the program. Click HERE to review the digital bundle that is available for the Winter 2021 semester. Students will receive an email in advance of the study term  about the required course materials. 

 

Are students eligible for provincial tuition support in the form of student loans or grants? 

Unfortunately, provincial tuition support does not apply to this program. However, there are financial support options available to students. For example, Queen's Law has partnered with RBC to offer a student line of credit for both full-time and part-time studies, which includes preferential pricing, and interest-only payments during enrolment and a 24-month grace period. For more details, please visit our Tuition and Financing page.

In addition, Queen’s Student Awards office administers bursary support for Graduate Diploma students on the basis of demonstrated financial need up to 30 percent of total tuition expenses. Financial eligibility requirements apply. 

 

Will I receive a partial refund if I pay my full enrollment at the beginning of the term, but I am unable to complete the courses and/or withdraw?

To determine if you are eligible for a refund, please visit the Office of the University Registrar website.
 

Entry-to-Practice (EPE) Exam eligibility

 

 

Will completing the Graduate Diploma ensure that I can write the national Entry-to-Practice Exam and become a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant?

Entry into and completion of the Graduate Diploma does not waive any requirements for the Entry-to-Practice exam that differ from admission requirements for this program. These include, but are not limited to:

•    Only Canadian citizens and permanent residents may write the exam.

•     Everyone seeking to register for the EPE is required to submit an ICCRC-approved English or French Language Ability Test. 

•    English-language requirements for the exam are higher than those required for the graduate diploma

Please see the language note on our Admissions page for details. For detailed information on EPE exam requirements, please visit the ICCRC’s website, HERE, to read more about language availability tests.